So, My Interview For Dreamland Took A Turn

Next time you think the world is coming to an end or is so out of control with corruption that it can’t possibly have anything to do with you, ask yourself why bottled water exists.

Those of you who have been following the blog of late know that I’ve been having some fun cleaning out my old drafts and writing tidbits that didn’t make it into my new book. The above quote is me cleaning out old drafts and was going to be the whole of this post. But, I just wrapped an interview with Whitley Strieber for his show, Dreamland, which will air November 27th. It took an unexpected turn for me when he described where I live in Hawaii, painting a picture of a dangerous, beautiful place at the edge of the country and the end of the world. This is accurate, no question. It brought to mind another truth about the place that overlays the entirety of this island chain, which is that it is the heart of Aloha spirit. 

Looooong before I arrived, believe it or not, other people lived here. They are called “Hawaiians.” They, like me, originally moved here by choice. And they carry with them the Aloha spirit, which is another way of saying an open heart, a love for life, and a real care for the land and the sea born of relationship, not a savior complex. 

This place is Heaven; this place is Death. What is it about this drastic place of stark contrasts that attracts such Love?

The Isle of Hawaii is a series of active volcanoes. It is the creator of life and the killer of life. It is the creator of customs and culture and ways, and the destroyer of same. You cannot live here for long without that impenetrable sense of love and caring, which informs how you understand this direct, perpetual lesson in impermanence.

And Love is you, anyway, so why not embrace it? As I said on the show, though it may not feel like it, Love transcends and includes all–including you, the person blocking out Love to find it. You are it. And you don’t have to be this seeking illusion anymore.

It’s probably easier to put off understanding yourself as you truly are when you feel like you’ve got time for that in the future. When you live on a volcano? … Not so much. In fact, to truly live here and understand what living means, it helps when you arrive leading with that Love, not seeking it. This is the difference between a people who calmly clean their homes, open their doors, and invite Pele’s lava in, knowing that it will take their homes in a burst of flame, and people who scream and flail and have a mental breakdown because their home owner’s insurance won’t cover this.

How do you weigh these two minds?

***

“Who are you in this moment?” That is the context of my podcast, The Experience, moving forward, no matter what the theme of each episode is. We all are at the end of the world and the edge of our country. The country is broken–the system, yes, and about half the people, too. And while Mamma Earth with be just fine, our time here, as we are, is up. The environment is altering us-as-we-are out of existence. The craziness you see around you is what happens when people try to remain as they are while Earth demands different.

It’s funny. Whitley asked me why I am here. Like, what am I doing here? It’s a tough question for me because I talk about all sorts of “crazy” experiences I’ve had and the “crazy,” likely permanent, state of my existence that seems to have nothing to do with Love. And then I end on Love. It seems to make no sense, which you’d expect from crazy.

Sane/crazy, sense/nonsense–Love transcends and includes it all. What else is there to talk about when we cannot get that fundamental right? Where else can we end up when that fundamental is us?

I, for one,  will not ruin Love just to declare, I exist and this is who I am and why I am here.

Because I exist. And this is who I am. 

It’s why I’m here.

I see what I did there, too!